Help Get Terror at 5280′ Off the Ground!

Terror CoverOver the last century, traditional publishing has brought us the most famous horror stories ever told. Big names such as Stephen King and Dean Koontz thrust horror’s tendrils into the minds of millions of Americans, popularizing the genre.

Fast forward to 2019, where small presses and indie publishing are now bringing us the lion’s share of horror fiction—including what I believe to be some of the best stuff ever written, in what many are calling a horror renaissance.

The reason is simple: Small presses have more freedom to publish unique and diverse voices, acquired tastes that might not appeal to a mainstream palate. While these conduits can sometimes be hit or miss, more often than not, they’re where you’ll find the most artful—and dangerous—writing out there. Giving free rein to authors is how a literary genre evolves.

Which is why I’m all shivers to announce that, this fall, Denver Horror Collective (of which I’m a founding member) will be publishing a horror fiction anthology of its own!

Continue reading

I Finally Found My Genre

JWN_Phage_2019_FB.jpg-4

What do vampire bedbugs, desert parasites, and zombie deer have in common? They’ve all had starring roles in my horror fiction!

Though I rarely lack for dark inspiration, for years I’ve struggled to define the specific subgenre of horror in which I write. For a while I was calling it “microbial horror,” as a lot of my work focuses on viruses and bacteria, though not all.

For instance, the novel I’m currently pitching, Alpha Syndrome, has to do with deer ticks, but I’m sure as hell not calling my stuff “tick-lit.” And then I wrote “Handgina,” and while some tried to label it “body horror,” to me that brings up images of guts and gore, which I tend to shy away from (in my writing, my reading, and life in general).

Over time, I pondered my (world’s largest?) collection of “nature-based horror” books: dark, clever, and often absurd tomes about killer sea birds, deadly snails, and murderous bodies of standing water. But while many of my stories do take place in or involve nature, that didn’t quite feel right either.

Continue reading

VIDEO: Defy Your Demons

Horror authors Stephen Graham Jones, DeAnna Knippling, Chris Phillips, Effie Rose, Thomas C. Mavroudis, Linnea Linton, and Josh Schlossberg unveil their psyches, recount the battles they’ve waged against their own personal demons, and share the stories these clashes inspired!

Presented by Josh Schlossberg and Atlas Obscura Society Denver

Filmed at Lighthouse Writers Workshop in Denver, Colorado on October 25, 2018

Video by Jeamus Wilkes

Video editing by Josh Schlossberg

Campfire Tales Double Feature!

Check out Josh Schlossberg’s story, “Viremia,” in Deadman’s Tome: Campfire Tales II. Pre-order your copy today!

DEADMAN’S TOME

This August, get ready for a double feature of unrelenting horror! Deadman’s Tome is releasing not one, but two volumes of terror. Demented tales carefully crafted by a mix of established authors and promising newcomers to create a blend that will haunt you well after your first read.

campfire_book1_cover_final_front-only6x9.jpgOrder Today

Share the stories in Deadman’s Tome Campfire Tales Book One and Two with others while gathered around a fire at night, and you’ll be remembered. Oh, you will be remembered as the one that sent chills down their spine, renewed the fear in their heart, and instilled an overwhelming sense of dread. While I recommend to share these tales over a fire, do not read alone in the dark.

campfire_book2_cover_final-front-only6x9Order Today

Dear reader, please take the cliche warning seriously and do not read in the dark. These stories contain intense images of graphic violence and disturbing content that is absolutely…

View original post 52 more words

What To Expect When Expecting A Zombie: Zombie Bacteria

Zombie Bacteria?!?!?!

When To Science

Previously, we looked at the zombie fungus that plagued carpenter ants and turned them against their colonies in the rainforest. Now, we will look at bacteria and the object of their zombification and destruction: silver. Throughout our history of fairy tales and legends, silver has been the downfall of many mythical creatures from werewolves to monsters that hide in the shadows. For thousands of years, silver has been used in medicine and as an antibacterial agent [1]. Nowadays, hospitals use silver to help patients recover and prevent infection. They use silver-based bandages, catheters, and other items in order to prevent bacterial growth [1]. Even consumers can get silver-based doorknobs, washing machines, and other silver products for their homes to prevent and slow down the growth and spread of bacteria all while also keeping werewolves out of your home [1].

Silver ions work their magic by tearing…

View original post 496 more words