Publishers Weekly Reviews THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR

Here’s what Publishers Weekly has to say about THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR, the horror fiction anthology I edited for Denver Horror Collective, due out Halloween 2021:

“Schlossberg brings together a superior anthology with a fascinating origin story…[that] ably demonstrates the compatibility of Jewish tradition, history, and folklore with the horror genre…This is sure to please fans of folklore-infused horror.”

Read the full review at Publishers Weekly.

Cover Reveal: THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR

Horror is part of the human condition, but few peoples across the ages know it quite like the Jews.

From slavery to pogroms to the Holocaust, the “Chosen People” have not only endured hell on Earth, they’ve risen above it to share their stories with the world.

Whether it’s pirate rabbis or demon-slaying Bible queens, concentration camp vampires or beloved, fearless bubbies, THE JEWISH BOOK OF HORROR offers you twenty-two dark tales about the culture, history, and folklore of the Jewish people.

OUT HALLOWEEN 2021

TABLE OF CONTENTS

An Orchard of Terror: Scary Stories and the Jewish Tradition by Rabbi John Carrier

Origins of The Jewish Book of Horror by Josh Schlossberg

Torah-Fying Tales: An Introduction to Jewish Horror by Molly Adams

On Seas of Blood and Salt by Richard Dansky

The Last Plague by KD Casey

The 38th Funeral by Marc Morgenstern

Same as Yesterday by Alter S. Reiss

How to Build a Sukkah at the End of the World by Lindsay King-Miller

Demon Hunter Vashti by Henry Herz

The Horse Leech Has Two Maws by Michael Picco

The Rabbi’s Wife by Simon Rosenberg

Ba’alat Ov by Brenda Tolian

Eighth Night by John Baltisberger

Bread and Salt by Elana Gomel

In the Red by Mike Marcus

A Purim Story by Emily Ruth Verona

Catch and Release by Vivian Kasley

Phinehas the Zealot by Ethan K. Lee

The Wisdom of Solomon by Ken Goldman

Welcome, Death by J.D. Blackrose

Forty Days Before Birth by Colleen Halupa

The Hanukkult of Taco Wisdom by Margret Treiber

The Divorce From God by Rami Ungar

The Hand of Fire by Daniel Braum

Bar Mitzvah Lessons by Stewart Gisser

Horror Author or Narcissist? You Be the Judge!

Pimping my book is turning me into a narcissist.

“What else is new?” some of you might be asking. In that case: It’s turning me into MORE of one!

Here’s why: It’s the only way to get my shit out there. Allow me to explain.

I happen to have been blessed with an excellent and generous publisher, D&T Publishing. Despite being a small press, D&T has done more to promote my debut cosmic folk horror novella, MALINAE, than the “Big Four” presses do for most of their authors. For that I am eternally grateful and, indeed, it’s the main reason the book has gotten out there as much as it already has, which is quite a bit.

However, in the sales world, we all know that a tiny percentage of products get the vast majority of buys. Take Coca Cola for instance, which snags half of the soda sales in the U.S. Is Coke really the best carbonated sugar water in the country? Not even close (not counting its cocaine-laced days, of course)! Hell, I’ve probably drank fifty different small batch colas better tasting and less horrible for you than Coke. But you’ve only heard of a few of them, and barely, at that. Because it’s not just about the product—which does have to be adequate—it’s about the marketing.

Let’s take this into the horror world. Stephen King alone gets the vast majority of horror fiction reads. Now, before going any further, I’m not here to shit on “the King.” I cut my literary teeth on the man and found him formative in my teens. Today, I still enjoy many of his stories and novels and think he’s a formidable storyteller.

But is he the best horror author in the world, the way sales suggest? Not even close! Hell, I’ve probably read at least fifty horror authors who are better writers and storytellers than him. But you’ve only heard of a few of them, and barely, at that. Because it’s not just about the product—which does have to be adequate—it’s about the marketing.

So what’s my point? That people should stop drinking Coke and reading King?

Of course not. Simply that the playing field is far from level, and we authors don’t have the luxury of simply writing good books and expecting them to fly magically into the hands of readers.

Continue reading

DENVER WESTWORD: What’s Scary? Josh Schlossberg on MALINAE, Denver Horror and More

I blackmailed Westword, Denver’s alt-weekly, to write a piece about me, and they fell right in line.

It wasn’t the pandemic that provided the inspiration for Denver horror author Josh Schlossberg’s new novel, Malinae, a yarn of biological horror about growing old…and perhaps growing in terrifying ways, too. But the pandemic did provide the time in which he could write it.

“The book’s biggest overlap with the pandemic is the isolation the protagonist experiences, cooped up in his house thanks to a severe case of rheumatoid arthritis and unable to participate in the activities he used to take for granted. And, as many of us have learned over the coronapocalypse, the long-term effect of isolation is an increasing alienation with humanity as a whole,” Schlossberg says. “Or maybe that’s just me.”

READ MORE at Westword